Real Estate

New home sales still well below historic norms of demand

Real Estate CNBC - June 25, 2018 - 2:13pm
CNBC's Diana Olick reports on May's jump in new home sales.
Categories: Real Estate

How Hudson Yards is going to change the NYC landscape

Real Estate CNBC - June 25, 2018 - 2:10pm
Jeff Blau, Related Companies CEO and partner, sits down with Diana Olick to give an update on Hudson Yards and how the future of cities will impact the future of working.
Categories: Real Estate

Any Fannie, Freddie Changes Require Care, Experts Say

NAR Daily News Magazine - June 25, 2018 - 1:00am

Preventing disruption to the availability of safe, affordable mortgage financing is key.

Categories: Real Estate

What Are America’s Most Posh ZIP Codes?

NAR Daily News Magazine - June 25, 2018 - 1:00am

The ultrarich’s biggest spending category tends to be on real estate. So where are the richest people in America settling down and buying a home?

Categories: Real Estate

Cities’ Design Tweaks Can Boost Their Quality of Life

NAR Daily News Magazine - June 25, 2018 - 1:00am

City design can have a big influence on how residents feel about where they live. A new report offers city planners ideas on how to create tighter bonds in the community.

Categories: Real Estate

Foreclosure Starts Rise in 43% of Markets

NAR Daily News Magazine - June 25, 2018 - 1:00am

View an interactive chart to see foreclosure starts in your metro area.

Categories: Real Estate

Why New Homes Are Getting Pricier

NAR Daily News Magazine - June 25, 2018 - 1:00am

Rising lumber costs are pushing up new-home prices by an estimated $9,000, according to the builders’ trade group.

Categories: Real Estate

4 Outdoor Projects That Offer the Most Paybacks

NAR Daily News Magazine - June 25, 2018 - 1:00am

Some summer outdoor house projects can help boost a home’s value by up to 10 percent, according to a new realtor.com® report.

Categories: Real Estate

Analysis: The Price of a Property Ripe for Summer

RisMedia Consumer News - June 24, 2018 - 1:06pm

With more activities, daylight, outdoor parties and vacations, summer is a precious time of year. Do you have amenities at home that make the most of the season?

According to new realtor.com® research, features that scream “summer” can earn homeowners more profit. An outdoor shower, for example, is at a 97 percent price-per-square foot (PPSF) premium—exceedingly high, because most are on properties on the water—while a barbecue grill, associated with summertime, is at 26 percent, and a pool and/or spa is at 25 percent.

“Buyers love special features that enable them to get the most out of the summer months, and are willing to pay more for a home that has them, according to our analysis,” says Javier Vivas, director of Economic Research at realtor.com.

MORE: Is ‘Green’ at a Premium? Depends Where You Purchase

However, location matters. According to the analysis, Massachusetts, Hawaii and New Jersey contain the most listings with outdoor showers, but New York, New Jersey and South Carolina have the highest premiums for them, at 256 percent, 164 percent and 140 percent, respectively. When it comes to BBQs, Arizona, California and Utah have the most listings with them, but only Arizona and California have the highest premiums (33 percent and 23 percent, respectively). Arizona and California are also contenders for the most listings with pools, but New York has the highest premium for one, at 224 percent.

When marketing a property primed for summer, the description is key, the research shows. In Michigan—where bitter winters and lake life meet—descriptions on listings mentioning “summer days” or “summer fun” command a 36 percent premium.

For more information, please visit www.realtor.com.

Suzanne De Vita is RISMedia’s online news editor. Email her your real estate news ideas at [email protected]. For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

The post Analysis: The Price of a Property Ripe for Summer appeared first on RISMedia.

Categories: Real Estate

Smart Homes: The Way of the Future or a Risk to Homeowners?

RisMedia Consumer News - June 23, 2018 - 12:01am

Glitches of early iterations aside, AI-based technology has come a long way, and has an increasingly active presence in the lives of homeowners who are looking for convenience and savings in a pushed-for-time era. From adaptive thermostats that automatically gauge energy usage and alter temperatures for optimal savings, to smart home speakers that use sophisticated artificial intelligence to provide services and information in real-time, a smart homeowner can now cross off a variety of menial tasks from their daily to-do list without doing more than speaking a phrase out loud or clicking a button on their mobile device.

What is the true cost of this convenience? Some gadget adopters are reporting invasion of privacy, security risks, and more. For those who have not yet invested in smart home technology, these factors are largely holding them back; in fact, it is the second-biggest reason for hesitation for 17 percent of non-users, behind price (42 percent), according to a recently released report by PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), “Smart Home, Seamless Life: Unlocking a Culture of Convenience.” In addition, 56 percent of surveyed individuals stated they would choose encryption to protect their data when creating their own smart home.

What are these misuses of technology that could lead to privacy or security risks? These are a few of the reported instances thus far:

  1. Gadgets May Be Susceptible to Hacking
    Last August, Wired published a story about a British security researcher for MWR Labs, Mark Barnes, who was able to install malware on an Amazon Echo device, turning it into a surveillance device that silently streamed audio to his own server. While newer models cannot be jailbroken this way, Amazon has not released any software to fix the issue with older units.

For the typical owner, this may not seem like a significant violation; however, this could lead to another type of home theft in which fraudsters break into homes looking to steal identifying information via smart home gadgets, leaving little to no evidence of their break-in behind. While Barnes installed code for the specific purpose of audio streaming, he clarified that the installation of malware could serve other uses, such as stealing access to a homeowner’s Amazon account, installing ransomware or attacking parts of the network.

  1. Smart Technology Could Lead to Location-Based Tracking
    Earlier this month, security investigator Brian Krebs reported on a privacy vulnerability for both Google Home and Chromecast—found by Craig Young, a researcher with security firm Tripwire—that leaks accurate location information about its users.

According to Young, attackers can use these Google devices to send a link (which could be anything from a tweet to an advertisement) to the connected user; if the link is clicked and the page left opened for about a minute, the attacker is able to obtain a location.

“The difference between this and a basic IP geolocation is the level of precision,” Young said in the article. “For example, if I geo-locate my IP address right now, I get a location that is roughly two miles from my current location at work. For my home internet connection, the IP geo-location is only accurate to about three miles. With my attack demo, however, I’ve been consistently getting locations within about 10 meters [32 feet] of the device.”

Google initially told Young they would not be fixing the problem; however, after going to the press about the issue, Young reports that Google will be releasing an update in mid-July to address the privacy leak for both devices.

  1. Glitches Could Lead to Invasion of Privacy
    According to local news stations in Portland, Ore., a resident (reportedly named Danielle) received a disturbing phone call from one of her husband’s employers telling her to shut off her smart home devices. After using Amazon devices throughout her home to control temperature, lighting and security, Danielle was made aware that a private conversation was accidentally recorded by Amazon’s artificial intelligence system, Alexa, and was sent to a number on the family’s contact list.

Amazon has since reported that the Echo speaker picked up words in Danielle’s background conversations that it interpreted as “wake words” for recording and sending audio to a contact; however, an article published by website The Information last July states that Amazon was considering obtaining recorded conversations and sending transcripts to developers so they can build more responsive software, making it unclear if these devices automatically record audio without waiting for “wake words.”

These Vulnerabilities Could Impact Real Estate
Smart homes are increasing across the country. According to Statista, a statistics website, the estimated value of the North American smart home market will be $27 billion by 2021.

Of course, the vulnerabilities that have cropped up for some users could have an impact on the selling process. For example, some sellers have already begun using their security systems as a way to listen in on prospective buyers or watch them as they visit the listed home, regardless of whether local laws prohibit these recording practices.

Additionally, if homeowners have devices such as Google Home or Amazon Echo, but do not have security cameras, how can they be sure that visiting buyers are not accessing sensitive information through these speakers? While agents always play a role in adding a measure of security by being present during showings, fraudulent activity that is internet-based only, such as obtaining online data through links, will be difficult to identify.

Liz Dominguez is RISMedia’s associate content editor. Email her your real estate news ideas at [email protected]. For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

The post Smart Homes: The Way of the Future or a Risk to Homeowners? appeared first on RISMedia.

Categories: Real Estate

Cannes: How one city is capitalizing on big festivals

Real Estate CNBC - June 22, 2018 - 2:41am
Cannes, France is home to some of the biggest festivals in the film and advertising industries, CNBC’s Elizabeth Schulze reports about how the economic impact of these events goes beyond the main stage.
Categories: Real Estate

Online Sales Tax Rules Could Be Commercial Windfall

NAR Daily News Magazine - June 22, 2018 - 1:00am

The Supreme Court has ruled that states can force internet retailers to collect sales tax, ending their advantage over brick-and-mortar stores and possibly encouraging more commercial transactions.

Categories: Real Estate

Survey: Top States for Homeowners in 2018

NAR Daily News Magazine - June 22, 2018 - 1:00am

What makes a state great for homeowners?

Categories: Real Estate

Long & Foster Carves Retirement Path for Associates

NAR Daily News Magazine - June 22, 2018 - 1:00am

The East Coast franchise is helping retiring agents sell their book of business to up-and-coming colleagues.

Categories: Real Estate

Home Prices Outpace Wage Growth in 64% of Markets

NAR Daily News Magazine - June 22, 2018 - 1:00am

National affordability is at the lowest level since the third quarter of 2008, according to a new report.

Categories: Real Estate

Mortgage Rates Drop Again This Week

NAR Daily News Magazine - June 22, 2018 - 1:00am

The lower rates marked the third rate decrease in the past four weeks.

Categories: Real Estate

Trump Administration Proposes Privatizing Fannie, Freddie

NAR Daily News Magazine - June 22, 2018 - 1:00am

The current administration has proposed ending the long conservatorship of the two mortgage financing giants, part of a sweeping government reorganization proposal unveiled Thursday.

Categories: Real Estate

HUD Under Fire for Response to Lead Paint Removal

NAR Daily News Magazine - June 21, 2018 - 1:00am

Federal officials found that the agency lacks adequate oversight in the reporting and remediation of issues in its public housing and voucher programs.

Categories: Real Estate

Neighborhood Activism Influences Inventory Woes

NAR Daily News Magazine - June 21, 2018 - 1:00am

Homebuilders struggle to launch developments as zoning boards and residents fight against new construction.

Categories: Real Estate

Report: Housing Costs Leave Third of Households Strapped

NAR Daily News Magazine - June 21, 2018 - 1:00am

The number of American households considered to be “cost-burdened” has grown by nearly 14 million over the last 30 years.

Categories: Real Estate